Vladimir Bonacic

Type
Associated person(s)
URLsReview Vladimir Bonacic - the early works, Zagreb 1968-1971
Vimeo Vladimir Bonačić & bcd CyberneticArt team: CyberneticArt


Awards
Award1968Nikola-Tesla Preis für Wissenschaft


Exhibitions
Group exhibition1971Septième Biennale de ParisParis, France
Group exhibition1971Exhibition on the Occasion of the 25th Anniversary of the UNESCOUNESCOParis, France
Group exhibition1971Art and ScienceTel Aviv MuseumTel Aviv, Israel
Group exhibition1970kompjuteri i vizuelna istraživanja / computers and visual researchRuđer Bošković InstituteZagreb, Croatia


Artworks in Collections
ZKMKarlsruhe, GermanyGF E 32 - NS


Publications
Monography2011MIT PressA Little-Known Story About a Movement, a Magazine, and the Computer's Arrival in Art New Tendencies and Bit International, 1961–1973Fritz, Darko/ Gattin, Marija/ Weibel, Peter978-0-262-51581-8Cambridge, Massachusetts Margit Rosen


1999
Picture

Died

Ittenbach, Deutschland

1999
1971
Picture

Projects

1971 gründete er zusammen mit Miro A. Cimerman und Dunja Donassy das »bcd« (später: »bcd CyberneticArt team«) und wurde Berater in UNESCO für den Bereich Kunst und Wissenschaft

1971
1968
Picture

Projects

1968 präsentierte er im Rahmen des Festivals »tendencies 4. Computers and Visual Research« erste ästhetische Experimente.

1968
1967
Picture

Education

Zagreb, Kroatien
1967 promovierte er an der Universität Zagreb im Bereich Mustererkennung und versteckte Datenstrukturen.

1967
1964
Picture

Education

Zagreb, Kroatien
Aufgewachsen in Zagreb und Studium der Nuklearelektronik an der Fakultät für Elektrotechnik und Informatik der Universität Zagreb (M. Sc. 1964) Aufbaustudium in London und Paris.

1964
1938
Picture

Born

Novi Sad, Serbien

1938

Croatian computer artist and cybernetician. Scientist Vladimir Bonacic (Bonačić) began his artistic career in 1968 under the auspices of the international New Tendencies movement (NT).

In the late 60s, Bonacic materialized his scientific research in a series of dynamic light objects, interactive installations linked by electronic logic.

From 1968 to 1971 Bonacic created a series of “dynamic objects” —interactive computer-generated light installations, five of which were set up in public spaces.

Bonacic criticized the use of randomness in computer-based art, as he considers humans to be simply better in „making the ‘aesthetic program’ relevant for human beings”. It was precisely his interest in science, focused on communication, theory of perception, cybernetics, electronics, and computers, that brought him to investigate optical structures, as well as programmed images and sounds.

http://dada.compart-bremen.de/item/agent/588 (24.09.2020)

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DIN. GF100 photo DIN. GF100 1969 Vladimir Bonacic 
Random 63 photo Random 63 1969 Vladimir Bonacic