Varda Chryssa

ZuordnungFrau
Verbundene Person(en)
URLsWikipedia
Institutionen/Museen


Ausstellungen
Einzelausstellung1979ChryssaMusée d’art moderne de la Ville de ParisParis
Einzelausstellung1972ChryssaWhitney Museum of American ArtNew York
Gruppenausstellung1968 - 2014documenta 4, 6, 14documentaKassel
Einzelausstellung1961ChryssaSolomon R. Guggenheim MuseumNew York


Sammlungen
Nationales Museum für Zeitgenössische KunstAthen
Albright-Knox Art Gallery in BuffaloBuffalo
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture GardenWashington DC
Museum of Modern ArtNew York


Bibliograpie
Monographisch1990Thames & HudsonChryssa: CityscapesDouglas Schultz0-50009-209-5London 
Monographisch1968Chryssa: Selected Works 1955–1967Diane Waldman0-93860-821-5New York Pace Gallery


2013
Picture

Gestorben

New York, USA

2013
1980
Picture

Projekte

New York, USA
In den 1980er Jahren und später schuf sie Barock-artige Installationen aus Aluminium, Kunststoff und Neonröhren, die sich im Grenzbereich zwischen Minimalismus, Concept-Art und Pop Art bewegen.

1980
1961
Picture

Projekte

New York
Ab dem Jahr 1961 begann Chryssa mit Neonlicht-Installationen zu arbeiten und war damit eine Pionierin auf dem Feld der Lichtkunst. Mit diesen Installationen schuf sie räumliche Zeichnungen aus Licht.

1961
1957 - 2014
Picture

Wohnorte

New York

1957 - 2014
1954 - 1955
Picture

Ausbildung

San Francisco, USA
Im Jahr 1954 ging Chryssa in die USA und studierte von 1954 bis 1955 an der California School of Fine Arts in San Francisco.

1954 - 1955
1953 - 1954
Picture

Ausbildung

Paris, Frankreich
Chryssa studierte an der Académie de la Grande Chaumière in Paris. Sie lernte dort André Breton, Edgard Varèse und Max Ernst kennen und hatte Unterricht unter anderem bei Alberto Giacometti, der Gastdozent an der Hochschule war.

1953 - 1954
1933
Picture

Geboren

Athen, Griechenland

1933

I first saw Chryssa’s work at the Museum of Modern Art, in Dorothy Miller’s “Americans 1963” show. I was impressed. I continued to be impressed by the sculptures and reliefs for which she is best known. They looked startlingly fresh and original. I did not meet her until later, and had no idea whether she was a man or a woman, American or foreign; I just knew that this was a really strong artist with a personal vision. Chryssa worked in many different media—including painting, drawing, and prints. In all media, her imagery often recalled calligraphy. However, she became famous for her sculptures and reliefs made of steel, aluminum, and plastic encasing neon lettering or fragments of letters, sometimes distorted or layered so they cannot actually be read. Artists had used neon before, but Chryssa made the colored tubes the basis of her sculptures. Sonia Delaunay experimented with it in the 1920s. In the ’60s, it came to be associated with the urban environment as well as with technology; Pop artists such as Larry Rivers and the French Nouveau Réalist Martial Raysse also used neon. But Chryssa was not a Pop artist. She came from an ancient Greek culture that was distinctly not contemporary but grounded in antiquity. She was excited by the strangeness of the “neon wilderness,” as writer Nelson Algren called the blinking barrage of signs and images that created psychic overload. In a sense, neon itself signified America and its technological advances. But there was a darker, dystopian Bladerunner feeling about the failure of technology to produce progress, which made Chryssa’s constructions both glamorous and ominous. Chryssa’s neon pieces used artificial colored electric light as a structural element, as linear calligraphic drawing encased in geometric, Minimalist structures. She did not combine text with images like other artists did. Text literally became her image. In the ’80s, she used Chinese characters inspired by the neon signs in Chinatown, a neighborhood not far from her SoHo loft on lower Broadway. Chinese was even more foreign to her than English, which she spoke well but with a decided accent. Barbara Rose 

https://www.artforum.com/passages/barbara-rose-on-chryssa-1933-2013-46422

Besondere MerkmaleFokus: Licht-basierte Arbeiten
Cityscape Times Square #2 photo Cityscape Times Square #2 1988 Varda Chryssa 
Clytemnestra II photo Clytemnestra II 1968 Varda Chryssa