Jim Campbell

ZuordnungKünstler_in
Mann
Verbundene Person(en)
URLsYoutube
Website Künstler_innen


Ausstellungen
Einzelausstellung2017Virtual ViewsKnoxville Museum of ArtKnoxville, USA
Einzelausstellung2015Watch This! Revelations in Media ArtSmithsonian American Art MuseumWashington D.C., USA
Einzelausstellung2012Marking TimeMuseum of Contemporary ArtSydney, Australia
Einzelausstellung2006Quantizing EffectsBeall Center for Art and Technology, University of CaliforniaIrvine, USA
Einzelausstellung2002Data and TimeCity Art MuseumNagoya, Japan2002 ,


Sammlungen
Whitney Museum of American ArtNew York, USA
San Francisco Museum of Modern ArtSan Francisco, USA
Museum of Modern ArtNew York, USA
de Young MuseumSan Francisco, USA


Bibliograpie
Monographisch2010Hatje CantzMaterial LightISBN 978-3-7757-2542-2Stuttgart Steve Dietz
Monographisch2007Measure of TimeLucinda BarnesBerkeley University of California, Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive


2013
Picture

Auszeichnungen

San Francisco, USA
13th Annual Bay Area Treasure Award, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art

2013
2002 - 2003
Picture

Förderungen und Stipendien

Monteal, Kanada
Langlois Foundation Grant, Montreal, Quebec

2002 - 2003
1999 - 2000
Picture

Auszeichnungen

New York, USA
Rockefeller Foundation Fellowship Award in Multimedia

1999 - 2000
1978
Picture

Ausbildung

Boston, USA
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, B.S. Electrical Engineering

1978
- 1956
Picture

Geboren

Chicago, USA

- 1956
--
Picture

Arbeitsorte / Ateliers

San Francisco, USA

Darran Anderson

... Jim Campbell (*1956) is a San Francisco­ based artist who has embraced the connections of light, space and time, as few others have. He uses LED technology and his skills in electrical engineering to masterfully achieve what Andrei Tarkovsky called “sculpting in time”. For this superlative exhibition at Dundee Contemporary Arts, the darkness of the rooms becomes a canvas for the lights and the illusion of motion. The galleries seem both vast and intimate. Campbell’s manipulations of space direct and reflect how our brains process visual information. He introduces the illusions and our minds complete them. “The more precisely one tries to observe something, the more obscure it becomes,” goes the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, a maxim that could act as the motto for this exhibition. From afar, we see a video of moving figures in the work Exploded View (Commuters), 2011. The closer we get, the more it changes. Directly before it, we see that it is nothing more than an exquisite series of LEDs hanging from wires, mimicking the movement of silhouettes. Walking around it, we see further into the mechanics from a different angle. The scurrying human forms are nothing but synchronised lights flashing. It is a disarmingly beautiful lie, which reforms as we walk away from it again. It is also, msomehow evocative. As a child, I recall seeing the end of a rainbow dissolving into a floodplain. When I moved towards it, it seemed to retract further and further away until it appeared behind buildings in the distance. It was the illusory play of light with water as a prism and yet it seemed utterly tangible. It was real and it was unreal; a reminder that our eyes deceive us precisely in order to make sense of a world of pixels, newsprint and refracted light. That feeling is awakened here. If Campbell’s work remained solely concerned with perception, it would be enough, but his work delves further. In an immediate sense it is immersive. The experience of Tilted Plane (2011) is akin to wading into the ocean or being surrounded by birds in flight. The space of the room constricts beneath the light bulbs and yet the dark seems interplanetary. This is expanded on in A Fire, A Freeway and A Walk (1999­2000), which resembles, to these deceiving eyes, a small eclipse, with swirling colours appearing like the solar prominences of a concealed manmade sun behind the velvet panel. Campbell goes beyond the limitations and expanses of appearances, however. His work is revelatory, particularly at the point where we intersect with it imaginatively and emotionally. We exist within a nexus of information and perception that we are barely aware of, a nexus that is further influenced by our memories, fears, hopes and all the accompanying narratives we tell ourselves. With Home Movies 1040­3 (2011), a series of videos are shown on a large LED screen. The atomisation of visuals, which exploded the view of commuters earlier, has an even more haunting effect here. Figures appear as ghosts. They seem sometimes sinister, sometimes melancholic, sometimes ancient, reaching through a veil not simply of electricity, but mortality and fading memory. This is film as clairvoyance. Yet such views are clearly in the eye of the beholder. These might be, as the title suggests, simply home movies of families and children and no more a memento mori than any home movie is, but then that is precisely the point. 

http://www.jimcampbell.tv/news/JimCampbell_%20IndiImag.pdf

 

Besondere MerkmaleFokus: Licht-basierte Arbeiten
Exploded Flat 2 photo Exploded Flat 2 2017 Jim Campbell 
Peripheral Rhythm photo Peripheral Rhythm 2006 Jim Campbell