Carlo Bernardini

ZuordnungKünstler_in
Mann
Verbundene Person(en)
URLsWebsite Künstler_innen


Ausstellungen
Gruppenausstellung2015In the spirit of LightMűcsarnok Kunsthalle BudapestBudapest
Gruppenausstellung2015Luz do MundoMUSA Museu de Arte da Universidade Federal do ParanáCuritiba
Einzelausstellung2014The Light WalkCastello dell’Imperatore – Cassero MedioevalePrato
Einzelausstellung2013Infinity,The House PeroniLondon
Einzelausstellung2011La Rivincita dell’AngoloMACRO Museo d’Arte Contemporanea RomaRom
Einzelausstellung2009Permeable Space13th annual D.U.M.B.O. Art Under the BridgeNew Yoek
Einzelausstellung2005Catalizzatori di LuceVelan Centro Arte ContemporaneaTurin
Einzelausstellung2004Espaço permeávelMuseo Passo ImperialeRio De Janeiro


2014
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Forschung und Lehre

Mailand, Italien
Unterrichtet Multimedia Installations at the Fine Arts Academy of Brera in Milan

2014
2008
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Projekte

Valencia, Spanien
Erfolgreiche Zusammenarbeit mit Santiago Calatrava in der Ciudad De Las Artes y de Las Ciencias in Valencia.

2008
2002
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Auszeichnungen

Firenze, Italy
Targetti Light Art Award for Sculpture of Light
LINK

2002
2000 - 2010
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Auszeichnungen

New York, USA
Overseas Grantee Award of the Pollock Krasner Foundation in New York

2000 - 2010
1966
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Geboren

Viterbo, Italien

1966
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Forschung und Lehre

Milan, Italy

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Arbeitsorte / Ateliers

Mailand, Italien

CARLO BERNARDINI: SPACES DISEGNED BY LIGHT
by Bruno Corà

.... In his Concetto Spaziale (1951), ‘a fluorescent arabesque’ about 200 meters long shown at the XI Triennale in Milan (1951), Fontana visualized the very first neon spatial environment. As Fontana himself declared, it evoked ‘the trail of a flashlight waved through the air’. [3] The influence of Fontana’s experience on his contemporary and successive generations is evident in the use of electric or neon light in the work of artists such as Nauman, Merz, Calzolari, Kosuth, Flavin and others. But a pure, extremely rigorous statement that came after Fontana may be found in the work of Francesco Lo Savio, who in only five years – from 1958 to 1963 – developed an exemplary and unparalleled paradigm of aesthetic and artistic reflection around the concept of ‘space-light’, with works in which light is the source of dreams, pursued with intense and dramatic dedication. Among Lo Savio’s early definitions of light, there is one, a breathtaking conception that appears in the catalogue of his exhibition at the Galleria d’Arte Selecta in Rome (January 1960): «For me light is not the consequence of an image, but the sum of several images in a continuous evolutionary movement. The idea of light as pure and simple observation would mean nothing were it not for its direct participation in the inception of life in its essential dynamism. Every aspect of its being is related to something else, then it follows one last direction that leads it to where it can lose the sense of what it is and simply drift through the void. This drifting, which in itself is nothing, is simply the way it appears: the image of an almost impossible reality». [4] These three cornerstones might be sufficient to provide the foundation for Bernardini’s entire speculation, had he not personally, on several occasions, alluded to the work of Olafur Eliasson as a dialectical reference which is however contemporary to his own work. But how is Bernardini’s work different and distinguished from the above-mentioned precursory experiences? One of the most amazing aspects of his work is the result of an image that, built by means of lighting devices (optic fibres) and based on their properties, creates a sense of detachment from reality in the space, an incorporeal yet visible entity that exercises both a designing yet virtual effect on the space. If, as Fontana diagnosed, it is always the means that revolutionizes artistic language, there is no doubt that the way Bernardini uses optic fibre can lead to extremely interesting developments. The examples created to date seem to want to force the medium and to address a more advanced conception of geometry which starts from a series of points of observation to diversify, change, dissolve or multiply in the perception of the individual. It was a common opinion among the best of artists in the Sixties that the use of technology in their works should not aim at objectives that would compete with scientific or technological advancement. They were convinced that anyone who sought to challenge their more advanced results was irremediably destined to fall short because science and technology, on their own terrain, were unbeatable. In fact, upon further consideration, the terrain of art was necessarily different, considering that the principles underlying its disciplinary motivations are fundamentally different and often opposed to the guiding principles of technology. In addition, it is inconceivable in art to rely on the criteria of methodological replication and objective verification which characterize scientific phenomenology. Discipline and science do not necessarily coincide, they can sometimes be completely divergent if their objectives are functionality in science and wonder or revelation in art. In this sense, Bernardini appears to work within the domain of advanced technology with an awareness and a mind open to speculation that are both ingenious and effective; he seems to use optic fibres at an “intuitive” and not a merely utilitarian level to achieve results in the field of visual arts. It is obvious that the processes to which he conforms his actions are those of drawing, with the purpose of creating an original, multi-dimensional spatial quality, free of traditional supports such as canvas or paper; a ductus unencumbered by the material entity, intangible and fluid thanks to the effect of light; a drawing that comes as close as possible to the idea and the mental perception of space rather than its true consistency. In Bernardini’s work, in the polygonal triangulations of lines of light that intersect the space to configure its spatial quality, there is no outside or inside with respect to their extremities, intersections or soaring apices. In fact, there is nothing more than an epiphanic luminous designation of the space without a material definition for it. Perhaps for these reasons, his work, upon closer observation, seems to reveal an additional quality: the beginning of a transmutation of the elementary data he uses which, properly developed, liberate consequences inappropriate to their apparent premises. And this is a terrain for wonder, which Bernardini exploits, which art has always flaunted and offered to those who hold it in high esteem.  [3] – L. Fontana, in Guido Ballo, Lucio Fontana, catalogue of the exhibition held at the Sala Comunale d’arte contemporanea, City of Rimini, June 30 – September 30 1982, p. 22. [4] – F. Lo Savio, catalogue of the Galleria d’arte Selecta, Rome, January 1960, reprinted in in the catalogue of the exhibition held by Francesco Lo Savio – Centro per l’arte Contemporanea L. Pecci, curated by B. Corà, Prato, February 22 – May 31 2004, p. 126.

http://carlobernardini.carlobernardini.it/eng/?page_id=2969

 

Besondere MerkmaleFokus: Licht-basierte Arbeiten
Fokus: Wahrnehmungs-bezogene Arbeiten
Permeable Space photo Permeable Space 2008 Carlo Bernardini